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Erika Rosenberg

Erika Rosenberg

Erika Rosenberg, Ph.D. occupies a unique niche at the interface of science and meditation as a teacher/practitioner and a researcher scientist. She is a world-renowned expert in facial expressions of emotion, a scientist who studies emotions and meditation, and a meditation teacher. At the Center for Mind and Brain at UC Davis, Dr. Rosenberg is a senior investigator on the Shamatha Project, a multi-disciplinary study of how intensive meditation affects cognition, emotion, and neurophysiology. She feels privileged to be able to study meditation from both the outside and the inside.

As a teacher, Erika’s integrative approach combines science-based training in emotional skills with practical meditation exercises in mindfulness and compassion. She has offered such teachings in international venues such as: Lerab Ling Monastery in Southern France, Upaya Zen Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico, the Telluride Institute in Telluride, Colorado, and at Google Inc., in Mountain View, CA. Erika is a senior teacher with Stanford University’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education, and recently she personally presented the Stanford Compassion Cultivation Training program to His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Erika Rosenberg also teaches meditation regularly at her home institution of the Nyingma Institute of Tibetan Studies in Berkeley.
Compassion is a gift that keeps on giving. When you develop a sense of connection and genuine concern for others, you not only help them with your presence and actions, you also give yourself a gift. How? By engaging in each moment with an open mind and heart, you learn not to run from any experience. As such, you become increasingly able to handle whatever life throws your way. Opening the heart develops strength, not weakness.
One can practice compassion both on and off the cushion. Here I offer a simple sitting meditation practice as well as 10 informal exercises for bringing compassion into your daily life. Pretty soon, the distinction between these modes of practice loses meaning. All of life becomes practice.