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Jerome Stone

Jerome Stone

Jerome Stone is a student of Sogyal Rinpoche, and is author of the book, Minding the Bedside: Nursing from the Heart of the Awakened Mind, a book about mindfulness, meditation and compassion practices, written specifically for nurses and healthcare professionals. Jerome has presented classes on meditative practices and compassion to healthcare professionals and institutions. Additionally, he has presented to corporate and professional organizations on stress-management and meditation practices.

It was just another busy day in the hospital and I was sitting in front of my W.O.W. (workstation on wheels) trying to catch up on my notes and charting. One of my coworkers ran up to me, and knowing that I'd written a book for nurses on meditation, said, "Help! I really need to learn how to meditate at work. I'm so stressed out here. I need to learn...now!" Without even thinking about it, I said, "I'm meditating right now, while I'm charting. That's what meditation is."
Thursday, 06 December 2012 17:57

Awareness: The Lightbulb of Meditation

awareness in meditation is the lightbulb that provides clarity

Lately I've been aware of my unawareness. And it's amazing how awarely unaware I can be!! I mean, when I train my awareness on my unawareness, it's like I'm aware and unaware at the same time! If this sounds a bit like Alice in Wonderland or Dr. Seuss, read on...

Meditation is about getting used to being in the state of non-distraction. Or, and this is even better, mediation is about not being distracted by your distractions!

When you begin the practice of meditation, you may become pretty disheartened to learn that your mind is everywhere else but on your meditation. Even after years of practicing meditation, there are times when instead of meditating, I find myself caught up in a sea of emotions and thoughts, unable to do anything but try desperately to ride the waves and not get swept away.

Compassion fatigue? It's an Interesting phrase, one that's used daily when describing what healthcare practitioners encounter when they burnout or experience loss of empathy while caring for others. And even though it's used a lot, I'm not sure that it really makes sense.

Just for the heck of it, I did a Google® search for the keywords "compassion fatigue in nurses" and came up with 110,000 links...110,000! Oh my gosh, you’d think that we’re all suffering from burnout, which can’t be possible…or, is it?!

Oh my God do I love to bicycle...and meditate! Maybe not in that order, maybe in no order at all, maybe at the same time!

These days my time has become even more limited than previously. I'm finding myself having to put every-bloody-thing on my iCal (computer-based calendar) and schedule things like...calling my mom! Does that ever happen to you, or is it that I'm just too busy? Anyhow...

 

Thursday, 19 April 2012 04:54

The Buddha Walks Into A Bar

There’s a standard American joke that goes, “A man walks into a bar…” and proceeds to have a short story ending with a punch-line. To get this post started right, I’ll finish the joke:

Sometimes I feel like my life is spent in a dark, smoky, crowded, and noisy nightclub and that I’ve forgotten that there’s a door that’s always open if I choose to leave.

(Because this site addresses compassion and how its presence can be invoked through the practice of meditation, I thought I'd come at the discussion from a different angle. Please let me and other readers on this site know what you think. Enjoy!)

Sunday, 25 March 2012 11:25

Memento Mori; Remembering Impermanence

The Latin words memento mori—“remember death” or “remember that you must die”—were used in ancient Rome and in medieval times to remind the people of the imminence of death and the uncertainty as to its hour or circumstances. It was also believed to have been used in Rome during parades for Roman generals celebrating victories or triumphs in battle. Walking behind the victorious general would be his slave, who was given the task of reminding the general that, although he was celebrating his victory, at any moment he could be brought down by defeat. The slave would shout the words, “Memento mori!”
Monday, 19 March 2012 10:46

Meditating on Compassion, A No Brainer?

Recently I've been taking to heart the connections between meditation and compassion. There are times in my meditation practice when I've found these sweet, inspired and clear moments - glimpses actually - where I can actually see how the suffering that I endure in my life really is due to my mind. And, with these glimpses I've begun to emerge from my claustrophobic "me" in realizing that we all suffer due to our mind.

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