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Meditation Blog

Here is the second part of Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche's discussion on the essence of meditation, go here to review the first one.
In this one he gives very practical advice on how to deal with difficult emotions, how you can use anger, low self-esteem, fear etc as support for your meditation.
You can find more about how to work with difficult emotions in Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche's book "The Joy of Living".

This is the fourth in a series of 5 posts on the history of meditation, adapted from Meditation- an In-depth Guide by Ian Gawler and Paul Bedson.
See here for the first, second & third part

When TM (Transcendental Meditation) came from India to the West in the sixties it brought two exceptional benefits. TM provided a reliable meditation technique that was relatively easy to teach and to learn; and it developed a strong commitment to research.

Meditation is about getting used to being in the state of non-distraction. Or, and this is even better, mediation is about not being distracted by your distractions!

When you begin the practice of meditation, you may become pretty disheartened to learn that your mind is everywhere else but on your meditation. Even after years of practicing meditation, there are times when instead of meditating, I find myself caught up in a sea of emotions and thoughts, unable to do anything but try desperately to ride the waves and not get swept away.

When trying to learn about recent advances in scientific understanding of meditation and how it affects our brain and consequently our emotional well-being, Daniel Goleman and Professor Richard Davidson are the two guys who I would want to have explain it all to me. And there is a fabulous cd or mp3 down load from More Than Sound Productions called “Training the Brain: Cultivating Emotional Intelligence” which is a conversation between Dan and Richard on just that topic.

Saturday, 29 September 2012 07:44

Tips for waking up in the morning - part 2

Written by Ian Ives

If this first tip doesn't do it for you, here is another way to motivate us to meditate first thing in the morning


2. Something to look forward to  

My teacher told a bunch of us once that it is very important to make sure your practice is something you look forward to doing. I think you can do this in a couple of different ways. For a start try to remember your original intention for taking up meditation. Somewhere, way back in the past, before it became some sort of penance or remedy for spiritual guilt, you may have had a real enthusiasm and interest in meditation, and it was something that you could hardly wait to try out. The key is to remember this feeling again and generate some sort of excitement about the thought of getting back to your cushion.

Thursday, 27 September 2012 07:05

Dealing With Pain And The Subversion Of Meditation

Written by Charles T.Tart

While my wife and I were on our Fall camping vacation last week, I was "meditating" near a pathway in a botanical garden on cliffs over the Pacific while she was taking photos. The rugged coast of northern California is so beautiful!

Since I'm always going on about how useless that word "meditation" is, unless you get a lot more specific about exactly what a person is actually doing, let me elaborate on that.

When my son was about 11 years old, he carted his Harry Potter book out to the backyard, spread out a blanket and announced, "I love my life."

I felt like I'd struck gold, hit pay dirt and won the lottery. What more do we want for our kids than to see them enjoying life's simple pleasures? In a world that is constantly pushing us to buy more, have more, do more and be more, it can be difficult to raise kids who feel content and grateful.

Here are some thoughts about how to raise children to enjoy and appreciate what they have.

This is the first of two videos where Tibetan Buddhist meditation master Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche discusses the essence of meditation. I find it especially inspiring how meditation helped him to overcome the panic attacks and anxiety that haunted him during his youth.

Thursday, 20 September 2012 08:55

The Michael Imperioli Interview

Written by Erric Solomon

A dedicated Buddhist meditator, Michael Imperioli is probably much better known for his acting work, especially for his award winning portrayal of the mobster Christopher Moltisanti on the Sopranos.  I ran into him at a talk by Sogyal Rinpoche last June in Queens, New York.

Wednesday, 19 September 2012 22:55

Making choices: think about "what is needed"

Written by Marieke van Vugt
These days many people tend to be overwhelmed with choices, from the simple everyday what we should eat and what we should wear to the more consequential life choices about education, career, spiritual path or life partner. I feel that this is an area where my meditation practice has definitely helped me.