Saturday, 24 November 2012 18:50

How Quickly Can You Change Your Mind?

A few days ago I saw a power point presentation on you-tube about a recent study on the effects of meditation and compassion practice on the brain. While there have been more and more studies of this kind in the recent years and months, what struck me most about this study was that it showed just how easy it is to change our minds (or at least our brains) with such a little amount of time and effort.
Published in Meditation Blog
Wednesday, 31 October 2012 13:59

Minding Your Time, Enhancing Your Mindfulness

The Pomodoro Technique - named by an Italian after the “tomato” - is an approach to time management intended to enhance your focus and concentration and reduce the anxiety associated with time.  It’s a simple but effective way to improve your work and study habits.

And this ruby red can help you with mindfulness too!

The system involves the use of a kitchen timer set to 25 minutes of time, but you can actually use any timer.  This slice of time is officially called a “pomodoro”.  Wind your physical timer or click the Pomodoro online time for 25 minutes.  Then set out on a task without stopping until the timer rings.

Here’s where your mindfulness training comes in.

Published in Meditation Blog

Meditation is about getting used to being in the state of non-distraction. Or, and this is even better, mediation is about not being distracted by your distractions!

When you begin the practice of meditation, you may become pretty disheartened to learn that your mind is everywhere else but on your meditation. Even after years of practicing meditation, there are times when instead of meditating, I find myself caught up in a sea of emotions and thoughts, unable to do anything but try desperately to ride the waves and not get swept away.

Published in Meditation Blog
Wednesday, 19 September 2012 22:55

Making choices: think about "what is needed"

These days many people tend to be overwhelmed with choices, from the simple everyday what we should eat and what we should wear to the more consequential life choices about education, career, spiritual path or life partner. I feel that this is an area where my meditation practice has definitely helped me.
Published in Meditation Blog

Here is Khandro Rinpoche on how we can keep the mindfulness we discover on the cushion as we go about daily activity. Hearing from my friend Gabriele that Rinpoche would be teaching in Berlin, I asked Gabriele to ask Khandro Rinpoche to make another What Meditation Really Is video. Rinpoche quickly agreed!

Published in Meditation Blog
Thursday, 23 August 2012 06:37

Leading the life of a practitioner

I am currently at a retreat in Lerab Ling, where we had a visit by an amazing lama from Sikkim: Yangthang Rinpoche. One of the most penetrating teachings he gave was about renunciation. Now that may sound really scary or irrelevant for modern life, but in fact I felt it was exactly about how to be a real practitioner of meditation in today's complex and busy world. The teaching gave me a lot of things to think about, which inspired me to write this blog, as a means of reflection.

Published in Meditation Blog

One of the things I've tried to do most of my life, both in my personal and professional lives, has been to become aware of the more subtle aspects of what I'm thinking, feeling, and doing. I especially like to become aware of implicit assumptions that lie behind what I'm doing, outside of my normal consciousness, as such assumptions can control what I'm thinking, feeling, and doing in ways that I'm not aware of, thus limiting my freedom and having consequences for the people I relate to insofar as such implicit assumptions affect the way I act.

Published in Meditation Blog

I work in an environment, where there has to be a lot of interpersonal and group communication. In fact, the whole aim of our work is to communicate FOR our clients. So one would assume that me and my colleagues are kind of masters in communication – whether in written or spoken word, by visual or auditory means or whatsoever. Nevertheless it is fascinating to be witness of how rarely communication works, even in the most basic daily business.

Published in Meditation Blog

Student’s question: I understand the fundamental problem of the dualistic mind (i hope). The idea that as long as something is "good" in our mind, that means something is "bad" as well, which causes us to have a misconception that is damaging to our mind. We can see with our own investigation that this is damaging to our experience of the present and reality. So what about good actions and bad action? Wise speech\unwise speech? Good intention\bad intention? Truth\ dishonesty? I struggle because those are dualistic concepts that are fundamental to the Buddha’s teaching. Are there some dualistic mind states that are helpful? I am most certain that I am confused! I would love some insight.

Published in Meditation Blog

Elizabeth Namgyel describes compassion as a radical expansion of self.

Published in Elizabeth Namgyel